Harvesting Seeds Part III ~ Hibiscus

Hibiscus botanical watercolor in journal ~ C. Maniglia, 2015
Hibiscus botanical watercolor in journal ~ C. Maniglia, 2015
Hibiscus - close-up photo. C. Maniglia, 2015
Hibiscus – close-up photo. C. Maniglia, 2015

Well, I have plenty of seeds now to bring with me to Florida. This was a fun 2-day project. (You can see Part 1 and Part 2 here and here.) I don’t profess to be a plant expert, but this is a good way to learn about plants and their names. I sure learned a lot by really taking an intimate look at these plants.

Seed Harvesting Part II

botanical drawing, C. Mangilia 2015 - cana plant

Last night, I did three drawings in my watercolor journal as a little record of seeds that I harvested earlier in the day, which I plan to bring with me when I move to Florida this November. The red flower is cana. The vine is Sweatpea, I think. I was getting tired when I did these two last night so this morning, I would like to add a little more detail on the brown cana pod while I have coffee and before I go on my bike ride. Kerfe left a comment on Seed Harvesting Part I and said this looked like a fun project from start to finish – Kerfe, it was, it was!!

botanical drawing, C. Mangilia 2015 - sweatpea

Seed Harvesting

This is the first of three journal pages I’m doing tonight to record seeds I harvested from my walks today. I’m bringing these seeds with me to Florida. Who knows what the name of this plant is? A type of Morning Glory? I’m just starting to learn the names of flowers, the more I do these kinds of botanical drawings. And if you’re harvesting seeds too this time of year, here’s another interesting post on the topic.WP_20150920_019 (1)

Bittersweet Berry Branches in a Vase

Bittersweet Berry Branches in Gold Vase - mixed water media. C. Maniglia, 2015
Bittersweet Berry Branches in Gold Vase – mixed water media. C. Maniglia, 2015

Bittersweet berry branches in a gold vase. Mixed water media.
Watercolor, water soluble marker and water soluble wax crayons on paper.

Yellow, burnt sienna, ultramarine blue, ochre, and touches of red.

Autumnal Berry Branches in a Vase ~ C. Maniglia. 2015
Autumnal Berry Branches in a Vase ~ C. Maniglia. 2015

Happy Fall!

Three Leaves ~ watercolor sketchbook study with work in progress photos

Three Leaves in sketchbook

Here’s the finished artwork in my sketchbook. If you’d like to see the work in progress, here are photos, showing different stages from initial pencil sketch with palest wash to more built-up color. You can also see the leaves I studied to paint this. For this study, I only used pencil for the initial sketch, and I worked the leaves up in watercolor from there. I like these gentle pale colors – end of summer leaves, dried crisp from lack of rain, alluding to the autumn season to come when more vibrant leaves will fall from the trees.
leaves work in progress 1 leaves work in progress 2 leaves work in progress 3

Finished - Three Leaves scanned art
scanned artwork – Three Leaves by Cynthia Maniglia, 2015

Going on a little WordPress break. Thanks for commenting and following. I’ll be back in a week or so. Have a good one!

Crotons

Crotons - mixed water media (watercolor and water soluble marker). Cynthia Maniglia, 2015.
Crotons – mixed water media (watercolor and water soluble marker). Cynthia Maniglia, 2015.

I like when photos inspire. When I went to the pool on Labor Day, I planned to photograph this plant just because I wanted to capture the color and save it to look at later. The more I kept looking at it, the more I thought it would be great to bounce off it and try to create a piece of artwork – for a textile pattern or just water media on paper.
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So many gorgeous “still summer” colors. I started out planning to use lots of yellow and orange and pale to mid-tone pinks. But for the paper piece, it seemed to want more greens. Watercolor and water soluble marker. In looking at the side by side image below, you can see how I used the photo for reference but did not feel the need to copy it verbatim.

tropical leaves side by side

When dealing with photos, I like to use them as references only and do a more interpretative piece of art. You can see how I pick and chose where to follow the photo and where to stray.

Acorn study ~ with work in progress photos

Acorn study - graphite pencil and watercolor - in my watercolor journal, on 140 lb. cold pressed paper. C. Maniglia, 2015.
Finished … Acorn study – graphite pencil and watercolor – in my watercolor journal, on 140 lb. cold pressed paper. C. Maniglia, 2015.

Painting acorns I collected on my walks yesterday and today. Yesterday, the big acorns were my big discovery. I didn’t want to take too many of them off the ground because the squirrels need them more than me. I’m just going to paint them; the squirrels need to eat them to live. The littler acorns I found this morning. Interesting to notice how symmetrical pattern is on the tops of the acorns. Drawing and painting the acorns today brought me closer to nature. I used two brushes and worked in layers, starting out light and building up the texture and color. I penciled the shape of the first set of acorns first, then painted, but went back in with pencil to draw in more detail on the tops of the smaller acorns. For the last big acorn (all the way to the right, bottom row of the finished page above), I didn’t use pencil at all.

And I wonder, is the page really finished? I might want to fill out my journal pages more. Hmmm, a thought!

“The creation of a thousand forests is in one acorn”
Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Darkened up and with more detail

Acorn study in my watercolor journal today. Working on higher quality paper (140 lb cold pressed) with watercolor pan paints and graphite pencil.

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close up